Deepa Naik  BDS , DDS

Board Certified Pediatric Dentist

We are located at:

125 Ed Schmidt Blvd,

Suite #240,

Hutto, TX

 DENTISTRY FOR INFANTS, CHILDREN, TEENS AND THOSE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

Healthy Smiles Begin with Champion Smiles


Call Us:  512-982-1500

email: info@championsmilesdentistry.com

  (512) 982-1500

Mon-Fri: 8.30-5.00 PM

Sat: 8.00 - 12.00 PM (2nd Saturday Of the month)

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Pediatric dentists are the pediatricians of dentistry. A pediatric dentist has two to three years specialty training following dental school and limits her/his practice to treating children only. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs.

It is very important to maintain the health of the primary teeth. Neglected cavities can and frequently do lead to problems which affect developing permanent teeth. Primary teeth, or baby teeth, are important for
(1) Proper chewing and eating,
(2) Providing space for the permanent teeth and guiding them into the correct position, and
(3) Permitting normal development of the jaw bones and muscles
(4) Primary teeth affect the development of speech. This is especially important in the early stages of 18 months to 2 years of age when speech is developing.

The front 4 teeth last until 6-7 years of age, the back teeth (cuspids and molars) aren't replaced unit age 10-13.

Children's teeth begin forming before birth. As early as 4 months, the primary (or baby) teeth to erupt through the gums are the lower central incisors, followed closely by the upper central incisors.
Although all 20 primary teeth usually appear by age 3, the pace and order of their eruption varies.
Permanent teeth begin appearing around age 6, starting with the first molars and lower central incisors. This process continues until approximately age 21. Adults have 28 permanent teeth, or up to 32 including the third molars ( or wisdom teeth).

Toothache: Clean the area of the affected tooth. Rinse the mouth thoroughly with warm water or use dental floss to dislodge any food that may be impacted. If the pain still exists, contact your child's dentist.

Cut of Bitten Tongue, Lip or Cheek: Apply ice to injured areas to help control swelling. If there is bleeding, apply firm but gentl pressure with a gauze or cloth. If bleeding cannot be controlled by simple pressure, call a doctor or visit the hospital emergency room.

Knocked Out or Displaced Permanent Tooth: If possible, find the tooth. Handle it by the crown, not by the root. You may rinse the tooth with water only. DO NOT clean with soap, scrub or handle the tooth unnecessarily. Inspect the tooth for fractures. If it is sound, try to reinsert in the socket. Have the patient hold the tooth in place by biting on a gauze. If you cannot reinsert the tooth, transport the tooth in a cup containing the patient's saliva or milk. If the patient is old enough, the tooth may also be carried in the patient's mouth (beside the cheek). The patient must see a dentist IMMEDIATELY. Time is a critical factor in saving the tooth.

Dental x-rays, known as radiographs, are essential diagnostic tools for the prevention of serious dental diseases and complications. They provide the dentist with valuable information not available through a regular dental exam. Identifying such problems early saves you time, money, and unnecessary pain. Dental x- rays can reveal:

1)Tooth abscesses or cysts
2)Bone loss
3)Tumors, both cancerous and non-cancerous
4)Decay between teeth
5)Developmental abnormalities
6)Poor tooth and root positions
7)Problems inside a tooth and below the gum line

Patients often ask if dental x-rays are safe. While x-rays do use low-level radiation to capture images, the amount of radiation exposure a patient receives from a full mouth series of dental x-rays is equal to what a person normally receives in a single day from natural sources present in our everyday lives. With precautions in place, x-rays are perfectly safe. Dental x-rays are not taken on every check-up visit. The dentist regularly reviews each patient’s unique situation and requests the x-rays only when necessary based on medical and dental history, regular screenings, age considerations, and risk for disease. Bite-wing x-rays (x-rays of top and bottom teeth biting together) are generally recommended once or twice a year.

Tooth brushing is one of the most important task for good oral health. Many toothpastes, and/or tooth polishes, however, can damage young smiles. They contain harsh abrasives which can wear away young tooth enamel. When looking for a toothpaste for your child make sure to pick one that is recommended by the American Dental Association. These toothpastes have undergone testing to ensure they are safe to use.

It is important to select a toothpaste that contains fluoride, as fluoride helps to prevent dental decay. Remember, children should spit out toothpaste after brushing to avoid getting too much fluoride. If too much fluoride is ingested, a condition know as fluorosis, which affects the permanent teeth, can occur. If your child is too young or unable to spit out toothpaste, use only a smear of toothpaste so that if it is swallowed the amount of fluoride ingested will be minimal.

Sucking is a natural reflex and infants and young children may use thumbs, fingers, pacifiers and other objects on which to suck. It may make them feel secure and happy or provide a sense of security at difficult periods. Since thumb sucking is relaxing, it may induce sleep.

Thumb sucking that persists too long can cause problems with the proper growth of the mouth and tooth alignment. How intensely a child sucks on fingers or thumbs will determine whether or not dental problems may result. Children who rest their thumbs passively in their mouths are less likely to have difficulty than those who vigorously suck their thumbs.

Pacifiers are no substitute for thumb sucking. They can affect the teeth essentially the same way as sucking fingers and thumbs. However, use of the pacifier can be controlled and modified more easily than the thumb or finger habit. If you have concerns about thumb sucking or use of a pacifier, or if this habit persists beyond age three, consult our office.


Call our office today (512-982-1500) to schedule your child's dental appointment. Same day dental appointments available.